One of the Best Careers of 2016- Training Specialist

According to US News, Training Specialist, also know as an Instructional Designer or Instructional Technologist, is one of the best careers for 2014, at least in the US. That’s good news for all of you out there who enjoy creating video tutorials with Camtasia Studio and PowerPoint.

Here are some other interesting snippets from the article:

  • Prospects (US figures): Employment is expected to jump by 50,500 jobs, or more than 23 per cent, to 267,000 jobs by 2018, the Labor Department reports.
  • Activity level: Average.
  • Stress level: Pretty low.
  • Money (US figures): Median annual earnings were $52,120 in 2013. The best-paid 10 per cent made more than $85,860 a year, while the lowest-paid 10 per cent earned about $30,120 annually.
  • Tech skills: “It’s helpful to know e-learning and some other technology skills. People who have that would have an advantage in getting a training job these days.”  Training Specialist

The last one will, of course, close doors for the many and open doors for the few. So you Instructional Designers, go get those low stress, well paid jobs while they last.

Your job will probably  help direct interactive, Web-based training sessions, multimedia programs, or even video training.

The outlook:

The future looks good for training specialists. Employment is expected to jump by 50,500 jobs, or more than 23 percent, to 267,000 jobs by 2018, the Labor Department reports.

Money:

Training and development specialists’ median annual earnings were $52,120 in 2009. The best-paid 10 percent made more than $85,860 a year, while the lowest-paid 10 percent earned about $30,120 annually.

Activity level:

Average. Much of the time you’ll be in the office, but some jobs call for extensive travel, and some may require you to spend more time on your feet.

Stress level:

Pretty low. Although travel can take you away from home, you’re likely to work an average 35-to-40-hour week.

Education and preparation:

Requirements vary widely among those who enter the field. You’ll most likely need a bachelor’s degree in human resources or a related field, with classes in training and development. Internships will be helpful in finding your first job.

Real advice from real people about landing a job as a training specialist:

Credibility, professional certifications, and continuing education counts, as does experience and expertise in your chosen training field. “Best case scenario is that you’re going to train people to do something you’ve not only done yourself, but have been successful at,” said sales trainer Martha Kroodsma.  Social skills and course management experience is also a must for this position. “You really have to have some instructional design skills,” says Pat Galagan, executive editor at the American Society for Training and Development. “Things like how to analyze training needs, how to design a course, how to deliver it, and how to evaluate it.” Trainers should also practice techniques to engage their students and keep them involved in the learning process. Galagan says tech skills will score you serious points with potential employers. “It’s helpful to know e-learning and some other technology skills,” she says. “People who have that would have an advantage in getting a training job these days.”

And how to become one you ask? Well, there is no better way to start than by taking our LearnCamtasia.com course! I teach you how to create awesome video training using Camtasia software and PowerPoint, create an E-learning Portfolio and how to work with your clients. Hope to see you there!

Best,

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